Blenheim, a rural locality, is 7 km south-west of Laidley and 40 km west of Ipswich. It is situated in one of the smaller valleys that drain into the Lockyer Creek. The origin of the name is unrecorded.

Blenheim received part of the large German immigration into the Laidley and Tarampa districts, but at Blenheim it was the German Baptists church that took root.

A government primary school was opened in 1879.

The German Baptist presence began formally with the arrival of the Mutzelburg family in 1884, and Carl Mutzelburg was the first pastor in 1895. The family connection continued beyond 1954 when the church's activities were moved to Laidley.

In 1897 the post office directory recorded Blenheim's principle agricultural products as lucerne, maize and potatoes. The land was also suited to dairying, and the Blenheim cooperative creamery was founded in 1900. After the creamery was replaced by a nearby dairy factory the cooperative movement continued with a sheep and cattle dip.

Intensively farmed Blenheim had a store by the postwar years, but Laidley served as its commercial centre. The State school has continued.

Blenheim's census populations have been:

Census DatePopulation
1911506
1961236
2006366
2011259
Further Reading: 

100 years of Baptist witness in Blenheim and Laidley, 1882-1982, Laidley, Centenary Committee, c1982